"Self-esteem, Mindfulness, Perceived Racial Discrimination, Impostor Syndrome
and
Psychological Well-Being among Ethnic Minority Women"
Takoria White
Counseling Psychology (Psy.D.)
Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Pei-ChunTsai
Presentation Abstract
The impostor syndrome can be defined as having a feeling of doubtfulness or incompetence when it comes to one’s accomplishments (Bernard, Lige, Willis, Sosoo, & Neblett, 2017).  Empirical research has shown that there is a positive association between perceived racial discrimination and the impostor syndrome (Bernard, Hoggard, & Neblett, 2018). In addition, impostor syndrome has negatively linked to African American women’s psychological well-being, such as depression and anxiety (Bernard et al. 2017). This quantitative study aims to explore (1) self-esteem and mindfulness as potential moderators for the association between perceived racial discrimination and impostor syndrome; and (2) self-esteem and mindfulness as potential moderators for the mediating effect of perceived racial discrimination on psychological well-being through impostor syndrome.

Keywords: 
Self-esteem, impostor syndrome, psychological well-being, perceived racial discrimination, mindfulness

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